A firefighting robot named Colossus helped 400 firefighters battle a blaze at Notre Dame

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The formidable device, dubbed Colossus, a remote-controlled drone equipped with hoses and cameras, was able to roll its way into the cathedral to help fight the fire -- which burned through the structures old wooden roof -- from within


A firefighting ROBOT named Colossus helped 400 firefighters battle the Notre Dame blaze from inside

  • An unmanned robot helped save Notre Dame from complete destruction 
  • When a fire threatened to subsume the cathedral, Colossus was sent in
  • The robot was 1,100 pounds and can carry equipment, spray water, and survey 
  • Colossus reduced the need for firefighters to fight the fire internally 

An 1,100-pound emergency robot helped to save a piece of human history during a blaze at Paris’ Notre Dame cathedral that threatened to burn the historic monument to the ground.  

The formidable device, dubbed Colossus, a remote-controlled drone equipped with hoses and cameras, was able to roll its way into the cathedral to help fight the fire — which burned through the structure’s old wooden roof — from within. 

Colossus, which is both fire-resistant, water-proof, and capable of carrying up to 1,200 pounds not only helped to stop the fire before it completely razed the structure, but reduced the need for fire fighters to enter the church where they would be in danger from falling debris.

At the time, the cathedral was only 15 to 30 minutes away from being completely burned to the ground, reports say. 

The formidable device, dubbed Colossus, a remote-controlled drone equipped with hoses and cameras, was able to roll its way into the cathedral to help fight the fire — which burned through the structures old wooden roof — from within

WHAT IS THE COLOSSUS ROBOT? 

Weighing in at 1,100 pounds, Colossus is a firefighting robot that can be controlled remotely.

It is capable of using hosing to apply water, can carry up to 1,200 pounds, and surveys its surroundings using an HD camera.

Colossus helps prevent firefighters from having to enter dangerous situations by reducing the need to work internally.

Other robots of Colossus’ ilk have also been deployed in the U.S. 

The machine, which is manufactured by a Shark Robotics, a French company, boasts a number of useful features that were deployed to success inside Notre Dame, according to the creators’ website. 

In addition to mitigating fires with its different hose capabilities, it is also equipped to transport equipment or injured persons, and also survey areas using it’s HD camera which has both day and night capabilities. 

With several different styles of remote-controls, maneuvering Colossus should come easy to anyone familiar with using a joystick. 

The bot’s agility is surprisingly adept too, with demonstrations showing Colossus climbing up stairs and adeptly swiveling around platforms. 

Colossus may be the most recent robot to enter the fray of fighting fires, but similar robotic systems have become increasingly popular over the last several years. 

One early iteration of such robots is the Shipboard Autonomous Firefighting Robot, (SAFFiR) — a humanoid style robot developed by the U.S. Navy which which employs algorithms to fight fires and help keep service members out of harms way. 

Other similar robots are also available in the U.S., like the Thermite RS-1 T3 — a squat tank-like unmanned vehicle that can be controlled remotely to carry out feats similar to Colossus. 

The success of firefighters and Colossus in preventing a complete destruction of the 850-year-old Note Dame cathedral represents a major win for the use of robotics in emergency situations proving that they not only work, but they help increase safety. 

The machine, which is manufactured by a Shark Robotics, a french company, boasts a number of useful features that were deployed to success inside Notre Dame, according to the creators' website

The machine, which is manufactured by a Shark Robotics, a french company, boasts a number of useful features that were deployed to success inside Notre Dame, according to the creators’ website

Though there were more than 400 firefighters present at the fire, in addition to other public safety officials, two police officers were injured during the blaze, but there were no recorded casualties. 

Rebuilding the famed cathedral will be a long process — despite France’s President, Emmanuel Macron, stating he wants it done in five years — and will likely also be aided by technology. 

Hyper-accurate scans were recorded using a laser machine in 2015 and could be the key to guiding future restoration efforts.  



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